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3 Steps to Getting a Good Night’s Sleep

You know that a not sleeping well can make you cranky, but did you know that how well you sleep can affect your physical health, too? Consistently poor sleep has been linked to chronic health conditions, from obesity and diabetes to hypertension and heart disease, as well as stress, depression, and anxiety. So getting a good night’s sleep is important.

What’s the connection? As you sleep, your mind and body repair themselves. If you’re coming down with an infection, for example, your immune system will release proteins called cytokines while you’re asleep. These proteins do two things: They fight infection and they regulate deeper sleep. The more sleep you get when you’re sick, and the deeper that sleep is, the better you’ll be able to fight the infection.

So how do you get a good night’s sleep? It takes a little TLC—Timing, Limits, and Comfort.


  • Try to go to bed (and wake up) at the same time every day.
  • Create a bedtime routine, such as reading, taking a warm bath, or doing gentle stretches. A nightly ritual lets your mind know that it’s time to wind down.


  • If you’re a napper, try to keep naps to 30 minutes and no later than mid-afternoon.
  • Exercise can lead to better sleep, but if you find it energizes you, keep late-afternoon or evening workouts to a slower pace.
  • Do you smoke? Remember that nicotine is a stimulant. Alcohol can also interfere with sleep.
  • Research indicates that TV or too much computer time too close to bed can have a stimulating effect on the brain. Stick with a book or magazine. Change bedroom lights to low-wattage bulbs and block light from windows and electrical devices, like digital clocks or cell phones.
  • If you have to get up to use the bathroom at night regularly, turn on a lamp with low wattage or a nightlight instead of bright or overhead lights. It will be easier to fall back asleep.


  • Create a comfortable sleeping environment: Do you need a pitch-dark room and no noise at all, or is the whirr of a fan reassuring to you? Find ways to regulate temperature, too. The goal is to make sure your bedroom meets your needs.
  • Be sure your mattress and pillow aren’t keeping you up at night. (One sign: You wake up feeling more refreshed after a night in a hotel or while visiting others than you do in your own bed.)
  • Find ways to manage stress. Taking care of yourself and making time to relax can help to put your mind at ease.

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